Welcome Guest, you are in: Login

Fruit Of The Shed

Navigation (MMBasic)






Search the wiki

»

A Simple GUI pack

Modified on 2021/04/08 11:03 by CaptainBoing Categorized as Graphics, LCD Panels
A purely MMBasic GUI pack to provide a WindowsCE/95 look-a-like LCD panel interface for your projects.

This is a work in progress in my spare time. This document has lots of improvements required - and I'll do them... just need a bit more time.
Still to come: Lists, Drop-down Lists, tab strips, pop-up windows (if I can work out a way to do it). As it is now, it provides a lot of functionality and is usable. If you only need the simpler end of the GUI - buttons, checkboxes, radio buttons and text boxes etc, it is good to go. Let's face it; they probably cover 100% of simple interfaces.

Enjoy

A Universal, Simple GUI pack

The larger MicroMites and ARMMites have a built –in GUI that allows your code to have an interactive LCD panel with all the usual gadgets (buttons, check boxes etc.) that we have become used to in the last 30 years. The MicroMite Mk2 is constrained in that there simply isn’t room in flash to add such luxuries to the firmware for these small but powerful microcontrollers. The following is a pure MMBasic solution so it can easily be deployed on any ‘Mite platform and thanks to the efforts of others is platform independent across the whole MicroMite/ColourMaxiMite2 eco system.

Image

Conventions

Throughout this article, things that get put on the screen using this GUI pack are called "Gadgets" (I was an Amiga boy – sue me). In the GUI software pack, anywhere you see "Obj" (short for object) it is the same as a gadget – the two terms are interchangeable here.


Variable and Constant name considerations


  • Starting with a capital are global (defined in the main body of the program).
  • Constants start with upper case.
  • Local variables start with lower case (defined inside a Sub or Function).
  • All arrays must start at 0.


Background

Many of my own projects use the small Micromite Mk2, a diminutive yet powerful PIX32MX170-based microcontroller with 60K of program flash and 50K RAM and have been, in the past, console only due to the pain of making a good interactive screen (on an LCD panel). In later projects, I have been building my own GUIs based very strongly around a WindowsCE/95 look-a-like. I just happen to think the nice clean lines of the GUI with its default grey background and relief style buttons etc is so much nicer than the "Metro" or flat look of Windows 10.

Not having a GUI subsystem, any such project that has buttons etc. had to be built from the ground up each time and were specifically managed with fixed co-ordinates and code to handle the presses of each button. It was a very inflexible solution. Modifications were a nightmare because the co-ordinates where specifically tested for presses etc. so if you moved a gadget, you had to hunt-down and tweak the code that looked for presses on it... annoying horrible stuff like that.

It had been on the back-burner of my mind to build (in MMBasic) a complete subsystem that got rid of that and just let me design the GUI then concentrate on the application code and not have to worry about managing the screen a-fresh each time. Other people had shown an interest in the displays on some projects and it was a bit embarrassing to reveal it was bespoke each time. The following is the fruits of my labours. It is currently about 12K in size – which might come across as a lot of space at first glance, but when you consider I would often have 5 or 6K of very inflexible code to handle a screenful of buttons, it isn’t that much of a sacrifice. You could trim it down to get rid of the bits you don’t want if size becomes a problem - as you will see it provides quite an array of gadgets. Even drop-down lists and pop-up windows (eventually)!

A problem with driving LCD panels from MMBasic on smaller beasts is the one-directional nature of the communication with the LCD panel... you can throw stuff on them, but it is hard work (and slow in Basic) to pull back what is on the screen and buffer it so you can repair "damage". In my approach here (confession: I have stolen a few ideas from my years as a VB programmer) is structured items that can be quickly re-drawn when scribbled over. An example here is the text box. At first thought you might wonder why you would use it instead of simply throwing text on the panel as normal. If you now think of a drop down menu drawing all over the screen contents, unless you know what it has damaged, how do you repair your lovely GUI? With simple Text, that isn’t possible unless you have buffered the memory of the affected screen area (this is what Windows does). With a structured text box, the list or pop-up can tell which items it has drawn over and so when it goes away, it can easily initiate re-drawing just those items.


Structure Mechanism

Two shared arrays hold the attributes of each gadget; its type, its place on the screen, the colours, its properties etc. The limit to the number of gadgets is available RAM. The values stored here are then used to draw the gadgets using the in-built primitives of MMBasic (Box, Line, Text etc...)

Each gadget has a numerical "name" that can be whatever you like. It is a number you decide in your program and is entirely defined by you - any 31 bit positive integer (I have plans for the top 32 bits). Internally, all objects are identified by a pointer, so where you see "n" in the code, that is usually it - you never need to concern yourself with it. The codepack will translate back and forth between ID and pointer as needed. Whenever you want to talk to one of your gadgets, you use the ID you gave it, never the internal pointer. You can use the ID to apply logical grouping to your gadgets.

I have an idea to allow pages of gadgets which would give a multi-screen effect simply by hiding everything not in a certain range... perhaps tabs along the top to select between the pages. You could even have several "layers" of them and simply switch them on and off as you see fit making context-sensitive "screens" a breeze.

There are lots of areas for improvement - speed-wise, I could provide a short-cut sub for drawing an object in places where we already have its pointer, but that's two Subs and then the size starts to creep up and we are impacting the precious 60K of Flash space. Always a trade-off.


Code Portability

The MicroMite range of controllers is very broad for a single concept. Tiny 28pin devices, all the way up through to the mighty ARM based CMM2. The astonishing thing here is the degree of code compatibility - certainly backwardly. I passionately believe in making my code as universal as possible and some tests done recently on TheBackShed forum have shown that the original code as first published was subject to "lift 'n' shift" onto several other 'mites and ran without any tweaks or issues. The CMM2 is a leap in what is technologically available on the platform and provides all the HID features of modern PCs - inevitably is is difficult to keep things 100% compatible as the language has to evolve to make these features available to the user. TassyJim (also from TBH) has done some Stirling work to maintain platform independence. This results in some small modifications to the code and where as these do increase its size marginally, I have decided to include them in the belief that compatibility is king across the various 'mite systems and that they are easily enough identified and removed if size on the smaller platforms becomes an issue. The pros of having the GUI work on everything out-weigh the cons of having to remove the auto-configure if you don't want it. If you have space - I strongly recommend keeping them as future releases of this code here will as well and you'll be saving yourself hassle in filleting the code when you upgrade for new/improved features.


Stuff you need to know (in no particular order)


  • Not all of this is working yet. Gadgets that have yet to be finished are shown.
  • There are nine different gadget types – we’ll discuss them all in detail further on:
    • Button, Radio, CheckBox, Slider, TextBox, List Static, List DropDown, Progress Bar, Frame
  • Every gadget has a set of attributes which are defined in the preamble of your code – that is just a convenient place to put them; you can actually define and redefine all aspects of a gadget at anytime. A function, GUIObjDef will format them and correctly fill the O() array to keep track without any further intervention by your own program.
  • Gadgets have properties and values that you can read and write to influence their operation.
  • After a gadget is defined and properties set etc., nothing happens on screen until you issue a Draw command for it (an exception here is animations when you touch certain types of gadget).
  • All gadgets are touchable and you can find out which really easily. Even gadgets that don’t generally do anything when touched (like Progress Bars) will report back their number if you touch them. It’s entirely down to you how you "run" your GUI.
  • Multiple fonts are not directly supported; if you set the font when you define affected gadgets and when you draw them, it may work. It will come but I just need to get it all working first.


Actually doing it – Getting usable Gadgets on the screen

There is some unavoidable setup required in the preamble of your program besides simply placing the GUI pack in your program. The following fragment of code should be placed near the start and executed before your program gets underway with its main tasks.

Preamble

'{mandatory GUI config
	Option Base 0
	Const cGy=&hdddddd'Pale grey screen background
	Dim Integer Objs=20,P=0,Flags,Xt,Yt,CMM2
	Dim Integer O(Objs,10)'GUI object settings
	Dim String Ot(Objs) Length 64'GUI object text
	Colour 0,cGy:Cls

	'CMM2 Compatibility - and any others if necessary
	Select Case MM.Device$
		Case "Colour Maximite 2"
			mp=MM.info(option mouse) ' mouse port
			CMM2=1
			Option Console Serial
			GUI CURSOR ON 0, 100,100,rgb(red)
			CONTROLLER MOUSE OPEN mp
		Case Else
	End Select

'}


  • A constant is defined for the background colour.
  • Some global variables are defined:

    • Objs is the total number of gadgets usable, increase or decrease as your application requires.
    • P is the pointer to the next available gadget number – this is an internal number and points to a position in the array – it is not your object ID.
    • Xt & Yt are the co-ordinates of touches detected on the LCD panel and CMM2 is a flag for Colour MaxiMite 2 compatibility.
    • O() is a two-dimensional array that holds the specific properties of each gadget e.g. its type, its place on the screen and is state etc.
    • Ot() is a single dimensioned string array which holds any text associated with a gadget. Not all gadgets have a text property.

  • Clear the panel to the default state of black text of the grey background.
  • Finally we configure the system for CMM2 if required.

All objects are described to the GUI system using the GUIObjectDef() function. This handles all types of gadget.


Key Functions and Subs

Functions return interesting values and are signified by a preceding =

=GUIObjDef(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j,k)

Has 11 arguments, some of which are optional and others which are redundant (meaningless in the context).

Returns -1 if there is no space to store the gadget attributes (increase Objs in the preamble). Other values can be ignored.

Argument Attribute Definition
aIDThe numeric name your program wants to use for this gadget. You define this, if you provide the same ID to multiple gadgets, the definition will be over-written. The ID allows you to group your gadgets sensibly. This is not the internal reference for the gadget.
bTypeThe type number of the gadget - see Gadgets and their Attributes below.
cXThe X & Y co-ordinates of the top left corner of the gadget on screen. These are given in "native" LCD panel co-ordinates i.e. 0,0 is the top left corner of the screen and 219,239 (for example) is the bottom right corner.
dY 
fWThe width and height of the gadget in pixels which go on to define the bottom right corner of the gadget. Remember these are relative values to the X & Y – they are not physical co-ordinates themselves.
gH 
hTextAny text which should be displayed with the gadget. This might be the word inside a button, the text in a TextBox etc... Not all types of gadgets will use this attribute.
iType SpecificOptional. This value is interpreted depending on the type of gadget. Consult the relevant section for the gadget type below
jType SpecificOptional. This value is interpreted depending on the type of gadget. Consult the relevant section for the gadget type below
kType SpecificOptional. This value is interpreted depending on the type of gadget. Consult the relevant section for the gadget type below

Each of the arguments is mapped generally onto the O(n,1 to 10) elements, with some processing where required.

Examples:

A simple Save button
=GUIObjDef(21,1,10,10,80,30,"Save";,,,1)

Red RadioButton in group 4800
=GUIObjDef(40,2,170,100,0,0,"Red",4800,&hff0000)

Blue progress bar ranged 0-5000
=GUIObjDef(61,8,10,210,300,20,"",0,5000,&h0000ff02)


GUIObjPSet(a,b)

Sets the Properties of the gadget (these are values that are useful to the functions of your program).

Has two arguments:

Argument Attribute Definition
aIDThe numeric name your program wants to use for this gadget. You define this, if you provide the same ID to multiple gadgets, the definition will be over-written. The ID allows you to group your gadgets sensibly. This is not the internal reference for the gadget.
bstatus byteValue to set in the status. This is a bit-significant value. The meaning of each bit is as follows

The Properties of the gadget (these are values that are useful to the running of your code) are stored on O(n,0). This status byte is a bit-field. Important: Some the properties require GUIObjDraw() to see.

Status bit meanings (when set)

Bit 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
 ReservedCleanUp Set TouchedVisibleEnabledReservedReserved

Note: All reserved bits should be set to zero


  • 2: Enable. Says whether the gadget is active or "ghosted". Disabled (bit 2=0) gadgets are visible on the screen (if bit 3=1) but do not respond to touches. When touched the touch processor will continue to return -1 as if the gadget were not there.
  • 3: Visible. The gadget is displayed. If bit 3=0 the gadget will have a grey box drawn over it to erase it from the screen
  • 4: The object has been touched. If the object is not enabled or not visible (bits 2 or 3=0), this bit is not set by the touch processor. This bit must be cleared by your code. Use of this bit can be avoided if you are polling for touched by regular calls to the touch process Sub, i.e. in the main loop of your program. If however you are using interrupts (maybe your code spends long periods away from the main loop), this bit records touches for later use(Warning: the order in which touches occurred cannot be determined).
  • 5: Records the value of a gadget if applicable. Mainly used for Checkboxes and RadioButtons e.g. the state of a checkbox is: checked=1, not checked=0.
  • 6: Indicates the gadget may have been damaged by other gadgets and should be re-drawn. For drop-down lists, any gadgets displayed below the top line of the list will be over-written when the menu drops over them. Such gadgets will have bit 6 set in their status. The menu close sub will largely take care of this automatically.

Examples:

Our save Button from above is visible and enabled
=GUIObjPSet(21,&b00001100)

Our red RadioButton is disabled
=GUIObjPSet(40,&b00001000)

For flipping individual bits, here are two examples using a combination of GUIObjPGet and GUIObjPSet...

... to enable a gadget
Result=GUIObjPSet(myObj,GUIObjPGet(myObj) OR &b00000100)

... to disable a gadget
Result=GUIObjPSet(myObj,GUIObjPGet(myObj) AND&b11111011)



=GUIObjPGet(ID)

Returns the Properties of the gadget. See above for the meaning of each bit. The single argument is the numeric name ID assigned to the gadget by your program. The meaning of the bits in the returned value are as shown in GUIObjPSet() above.

Example:

Has our save button been touched?
=GUIObjPGet(21) AND &b00010000

A non-zero result says yes, otherwise no. As an aside, there are two approaches for detecting touches which are discussed in the section "Interrupt or not?" below



GUIObjVSet(ID,x)

Set the numeric value of a slider or progress bar. The value will be constrained to within the limits specified for the gadget in the corresponding GUIObjDef()


=GUIObjVGet(ID)

Returns the numeric value of a Slider,ProgressBar, CheckBox or RadioButton. For Sliders & ProgressBars the number returned is the actual value within its range. The value will be constrained to within the limits specified for the gadget in the corresponding GUIObjDef()

For CheckBoxes and RadioButtons, the value returned is 0=not selected, <>0=selected.


The Gadgets and their Attributes

We have discussed the functions to get gadgets on the screen, what their properties mean and how to manipulate them. There now follows a detailed discussion of each gadget type.




Buttons


Image

Buttons are the "traditional" command button. Rectangular, bordered areas (it is there even if you don’t show it) of the screen. The entire area is active, i.e. it causes an action if you click anywhere inside it. Usually there is some text which is displayed centrally both horizontally and vertically. It is usual for the border to have a raised appearance and to be animated to a depressed appearance when clicked, returning to its former when released.
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type1
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
<null>Argument is ignored
<null>Argument is ignored
TextButton text
Background ColourThe colour of the face of the button
Text ColourThe colour of the text of the button. When a button is disabled, this value is over-ridden by the "ghost" colour
Border TypeUsually 1, consult the section on border types for options

Buttons do not have numeric values that can be altered.

GUIObjVSet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
aArgument is ignored

To change the text of a Frame, set the Ot(n) value directly

Example:
Ot(GUIObjFind(id))="New Text"
GUIObjDraw id



RadioButtons


Image

RadioButtons are an option button. A circular area bounded by a circular border in relief. Once activated, they can only be de-activated by touching another RadioButton in the same group. Its state can be set or unset by program control manipulating the SET bit in the gadget’s properties. Usually there is some text which is displayed to the right of the RadioButton. The entire area is active – including the text, i.e. it causes an action if you click anywhere on the button or its label. This makes it easier to activate on smaller displays as precise touch is not so critical. An activated RadioButton has a depressed circular appearance. A de-activated RadioButton has a raised circular appearance. Any change is animated when touched or under program control.

The Height of a RadioButton is fixed at 11 pixels, Width is determined by the length of the text+15 pixels.
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type2
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
<null>Argument is ignored
<null>Argument is ignored
TextRadioButton text
GroupThe group to which this button belongs. Buttons in the same group are affected by the operation of their members e.g. activating a button will deactivate all others in the group
ColourThe colour for the central "dot" of the button as &hRRGGBB
<null>Argument is ignored

RadioButtons do not have numeric values that can be altered.

GUIObjVSet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
aArgument is ignored


Retrieving a RadioButton value. Besides reading the Set bit in the status register of a RadioButton, the state can also be found as follows

=GUIObjVGet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object

Return: 0=Not selected, <>0=selected.

To change the text of a RadioButton, set the Ot(n) value directly

Example:
Ot(GUIObjFind(id))="New Text"
GUIObjDraw(id)


CheckBoxes


Image

Checkboxes are a toggling option button. A small area bounded by a square border in relief. Once activated, they can be de-activated by touching again and vice versa. Its state can be set or unset by program control manipulating the SET bit in the gadget’s properties. Usually there is some text which is displayed to the right of the Checkbox. The entire area is active – including the text, i.e. it causes an action if you click anywhere on the Checkboxes or its label. This makes it easier to activate on smaller displays as precise touch is not so critical. An activated Checkbox has a depressed circular appearance. A de-activated Checkbox has a raised circular appearance. Any change is animated when touched or under program control.

The Height of a Checkbox is fixed at 11 pixels, Width is determined by the length of the text+15 pixels.
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type3
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
<null>Argument is ignored
<null>Argument is ignored
TextCheckbox text
<null>Argument is ignored
<null>Argument is ignored
<null>Argument is ignored

CheckBoxes do not have numeric values that can be altered.

GUIObjVSet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
aArgument is ignored
bArgument is ignored
cArgument is ignored

Retrieving a CheckBox value. Besides reading the Set bit in the status register of a CheckBox, the state can be found as follows

=GUIObjVGet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object

Return: 0=Not selected, <>0=selected.

To change the text of a CheckBox, set the Ot(n) value directly

Example:
Ot(GUIObjFind(id))="New Text"
GUIObjDraw id


Frames


Image

A simple rectangular box with a text label. Used for grouping related gadgets more for aesthetics than functionality. Beware defining Frames before the gadgets they contain. They can prevent gadgets from being identified when touched in favour of the enclosing frame. Best to places gadgets on the screen then place Frames last of all.

Unlike desktop GUIs, disabling a frame will not automatically disable all items within it.
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type9
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
WDimensions Width and Height
H 
TextFrame text
<null>Argument is ignored
<null>Argument is ignored
Border TypeUsually 5, consult the section on border types for options

Frames do not have numeric values that can be altered.

GUIObjVSet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
aArgument is ignored
bArgument is ignored
cArgument is ignored

To change the text of a Frame, set the Ot(n) value directly

Example:
Ot(GUIObjFind(id))="New Text"
GUIObjDraw id


TextBoxes


Image

A rectangular area in which text is written. May have any style of border
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type5
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
WDimensions Width and Height
H 
TextText value of the text field
Background colour (paper)Background colour as &hRRGGBB
Foreground colour (pen)Foreground colour as &hRRGGBB
Border Type and AlignmentBorder type and Alignment are stuffed in a single byte. Consult the section on border types for options

TextBoxes do not have numeric values that can be altered.

GUIObjVSet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
aArgument is ignored
bArgument is ignored
cArgument is ignored


To change the text of a TextBoxes, set the Ot(n) value directly

Example:
Ot(GUIObjFind(id))="New Text"
GUIObjDraw id


Progress bars


Image

A progress bar is a rectangular area with increasing/decreasing coverage depending on the current set value. The minimum and maximum extremes of the range are settable to any value and the physical size of the bar on the screen will be scaled accordingly. The border of the bar may be set to any frame style although the depressed button appearance is most usual.

Progress bars may be horizontal or vertical. They always progress low to high as left to right or bottom to top respectively
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type8
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
WDimensions Width and Height
H 
<null>Progress bars do not have a text attribute, Set to ""
Bottom of rangeAny numeric value < top of range
Top of rangeAny numeric value > bottom of range
Colour, Border Type and AlignmentBorder type and Alignment are stuffed in a single byte. Consult the section on border types for options


Setting ProgressBar value.

GUIObjVSet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
aCurrent value to set the slider. This will be constrained to the relevant range given in GUIObjDef()

Retrieving the ProgressBar value.

=GUIObjVGet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object

Returns the current value of the ProgressBar.


Sliders


Image

A moving button that can be slid up and down a scale to indicate a value. The minimum and maximum extremes of the range are settable to any value and the physical size of the slider on the screen scales accordingly.
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type4
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
WWidth of the slider
<null>Argument is ignored
<null>Sliders do not have a text attribute, Set to ""
Bottom of rangeAny numeric value < top of range
Top of rangeAny numeric value > bottom of range
Paired Gadget IDThe ID of a linked item to have its text attribute mirror the Slider value. See the discussion below on Object Pairing.

Setting the Slider value.
Besides operating the slider using the touch interface, slider values can be set program control.

GUIObjVSet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
aCurrent value to set the slider. This will be constrained to the relevant range given in GUIObjDef()

Retrieving the Slider value.

=GUIObjVGet  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object

Returns the current value of the Slider.

Object Pairing
When moving a Slider, it is usual to need to see some feedback on the value as it varies. Within the Slider this is not possible for three reasons:

  1. While moving the slider your code is not running (ProcessTouch() is) and the value the slider settled at can only be reported once the Slider is released.
  2. ProcessTouch() has no idea what you want to do with the values your set and so makes no assumptions.
  3. Putting the value in the slider button is impractical because the width of the text could destroy the aesthetics of the slider.

To provide some indication, the ID of another gadget can be set to have its text attribute linked to the value of the Slider. As the slider is moved, ProcessTouch() will update the paired gadget (perhaps a TextBox).


List Static

Similar in appearance to the text box, the Static list has direction arrows at each end and the list can be navigated through with the current selected item displaying in the text area.
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type7
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
WDimensions Width and Height
H 
TextFrame text
Background colour (paper)Background colour as &hRRGGBB
Foreground colour (pen)Foreground colour as &hRRGGBB
Border Type and AlignmentBorder type and Alignment are stuffed in a single byte. Consult the section on border types for options



List Drop-Down

Similar in appearance to the text box, the Drop-down list displays a rectangular area containing lines of text when touched. An item may be selected by touching it. If more items exist than the box can contain, the up and down arrows on the right of the drop-down can be used to navigate through the list. When an item is selected, the drop-down box is erased, the text is set to the selected item and any damaged items (where the drop-down obliterated them) are set for cleanup.
GUIObjDef Attributes  
IDThe numeric name your program will use for this object
Type7
XLocation co-ordinates on screen X,Y
Y 
WDimensions Width and Height
H 
TextFrame text
Background colour (paper)Background colour as &hRRGGBB
Foreground colour (pen)Foreground colour as &hRRGGBB
Border Type and AlignmentBorder type and Alignment are stuffed in a single byte. Consult the section on border types for options


Border Types and alignment

Not all gadgets support a border type but for those that do, the value contains several indicators in a single integer.

Alignment ValueByte 3Byte 2Byte 1 Byte 0
 Red for stuffed colourGreen for stuffed colourBlue for stuffed colourBorder Style and Alignment

The rightmost byte is further interpreted by it's two nibbles thus:

Bit 7-4Bits 3-0 Description
x0No Border
x1Button style raised
x2Button style depressed
x3White
x4Black
x5Grey (disabled)
0xAlign Left/Horizontal
1xAlign Centre/Vertical
2xAlign Right

Example:

Image

Due to redundancy, not all border/alignment combinations are applicable to any given gadget



The Code
'V0.68

'{mandatory GUI config
	Option Base 0
	Const CGy=&hdddddd,Cgh=&h909090'Pale grey screen background
	Colour 0,cGy:Cls
	Dim Integer Objs=20,P=0,Flags,Xt,Yt,CMM2
	Dim Integer O(Objs,10)'GUI object settings
	Dim String Ot(Objs) Length 63'GUI object text

	'CMM2 Compatibility - and any others if necessary
	Select Case MM.Device$
		Case "Colour Maximite 2"
			mp=MM.info(Option Mouse) ' mouse port
			CMM2=1
			Option Console Serial
			GUI Cursor On 0, 100,100,rgb(red)
			Controller Mouse Open mp
		Case Else
	End Select
'}

	Backlight 80' 100 is off

MainInit:

	Dim Integer res

'Buttons
	res=GUIObjDef(21,1,10,10,80,30,"Save",&hff0000,&hffffff,1)
	res=GUIObjDef(23,1,10,50,80,30,"Exit",,,1)
'Checkboxes
	res=GUIObjDef(25,3,10,100,,,"Checked")
	res=GUIObjDef(27,3,10,120,,,"Disabled")
	res=GUIObjDef(29,3,10,140,,,"Not Checked")
'Radio boxes (in a frame)
	res=GUIObjDef(40,2,170,100,,,"Red",1,&hff0000)
	'res=GUIObjDef(40,2,170,100,,,"Red",1,0)
	res=GUIObjDef(41,2,170,120,,,"Green",1,&hff00)
	'res=GUIObjDef(41,2,170,120,,,"Green",1,0)
	res=GUIObjDef(42,2,170,140,,,"Blue",1,&hff)
	'res=GUIObjDef(42,2,170,140,,,"Blue",1,0)
	res=GUIObjDef(39,9,165,90,80,65,"Colours",,,&h05)
'text boxes
	res=GUIObjDef(50,5,160,10,150,15,"L Text black frame",&h00aa00,&hffff00,&h04)
	res=GUIObjDef(51,5,160,35,150,15,"C Text no frame",cGy,0,&h10)
	res=GUIObjDef(52,5,160,60,150,15,"",&hffffff,0,&h22)
'progress bar
	res=GUIObjDef(61,8,10,210,300,20,"",0,500,&h0000ff02)
	res=GUIObjDef(62,8,270,90,40,65,"",0,500,&hff000012)
'Slider
	res=GUIObjDef(71,4,20,180,100,,"",0,500,51)

Main:
'set the properties of the object, visibility, enabled etc...
	res=GUIObjPSet(21,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(23,&b00001000)
	res=GUIObjPSet(25,&b00101100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(27,&b00101000)
	res=GUIObjPSet(29,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(39,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(40,&b00101100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(41,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(42,&b00001000)
	res=GUIObjPSet(50,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(51,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(52,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(61,&b00001100)
	res=GUIObjPSet(62,&b00001100)

	res=GUIObjPSet(71,&b00001100)

'nothing appears on the screen until you draw the object
'this allows multiple updates at once and you control when it happens
	GUIObjDraw 21
	GUIObjDraw 23
	GUIObjDraw 25
	GUIObjDraw 27
	GUIObjDraw 29
	GUIObjDraw 39
	GUIObjDraw 40
	GUIObjDraw 41
	GUIObjDraw 42
	GUIObjDraw 50
	GUIObjDraw 51
	GUIObjDraw 52
	GUIObjDraw 61
	GUIObjDraw 62

	GUIObjVSet 71,250
	GUIObjDraw 71

'a little example code
	q=1000
	If res <>-1 Then
		timer=0
'draw the progress bars for increasing value
		For n=1 To q step 25
				GUIObjVSet 61,n
				GUIObjDraw 61
				GUIObjVSet 62,q-n
				GUIObjDraw 62
		Next
'set the contents of a text box
		Ot(GUIObjFind(52))="R "+Str$(timer/n)+"mS"
		GUIObjDraw 52
	EndIf

'go round in a loop printing (to the console) the ID (numeric name) of
'any touched objects and how long it was touched for
	Do
		Timer=0
		q=ProcessTouch()
		If q<>-1 Then ? "Obj ";q,,"Dwell";Timer;"mS"
		'get the value from the slider and update a text box
		If q=71 Then
			For m=50 to 52
				'Ot(GUIObjFind(m))=Str$(GUIObjVGet(71)):GUIObjDraw m
			Next
		EndIf
		Pause 100
	Loop

	End


'------------------ The GUI pack
'Main touch processor. Regular calls here will get the numeric name of
'screen objects that are touched, return -1 if no object is touched
'animates and manages status etc
	Function ProcessTouch() As Integer
		ProcessTouch=-1
		GetTouch
		If Xt=-1 Then Exit Function
		Local Integer n,m
		For n=0 To P-1
			If Xt>=O(n,3) Then
				If Yt>=O(n,4) Then
					If Xt<=O(n,5) Then
						If Yt<=O(n,6) Then
							If O(n,2) And 8 Then
								If O(n,2) And 4 Then
									ProcessTouch=O(n,0)
									O(n,2)=O(n,2) Or &b00010000'touched
									Select Case O(n,1)'click animation
										Case 1
											O(n,9)=2
											GUIObjDraw O(n,0)
										Case 2
											For m=0 To P
												If O(n,0)<>O(m,0) Then
													If O(m,1)=2 Then
														If O(m,7)=O(n,7) Then
															O(m,2)=O(m,2) And &b11011111
															GUIObjDraw O(m,0)
														EndIf
													EndIf
												EndIf
											Next
											O(n,2)=O(n,2) Or &h20
											GUIObjDraw O(n,0)
										Case 3
											If O(n,2) And &b00100000 Then
												O(n,2)=O(n,2) And &b11011111
											Else
												O(n,2)=O(n,2) Or &b00100000
											EndIf
											GUIObjDraw O(n,0)
										Case 4'slider
											Local w
											If CMM2 Then GUI Cursor Hide
											Do
												'Watchdog in here
												GetTouch
												If Xt=-1 Then Exit Do
												w=O(n,5)-O(n,3)
												Xt=Constrain(Xt-O(n,3),0,w)
												w=Xt/(w/(O(n,8)-O(n,7)))
												GUIObjVSet O(n,0),w
												If O(n,9) Then
													Ot(GUIObjFind(O(n,9)))=Str$(w):GUIObjDraw O(n,9)
												EndIf
												GUIObjDraw O(n,0)
											Loop
											If CMM2 Then GUI Cursor Show
										Case 6
										Case 7
									End Select
									WaitNoTouch
									Select Case O(n,1)'release animation
										Case 1
											O(n,9)=1
											GUIObjDraw O(n,0)
										Case 6
										Case 7
									End Select
									Exit Function
								EndIf
							EndIf
						EndIf
					EndIf
				EndIf
			EndIf
		Next
	End Function

'waits for the stylus to be lifted off the panel
	Sub WaitNoTouch
		If CMM2 Then
			Do
			'Watchdog here if you want it
			Pause 10
			Loop Until Mouse(L,mp)=0
		Else
			Do
			'Watchdog here if you want it
			Pause 10
			Loop Until Touch(X)=-1
		EndIf
	End Sub

'Sub will draw any object in it's current state
	Sub GuiObjDraw(id As Integer)
		Local Integer n,m,x,y,z,w,h
		Local Float nn
		Local a$
		n=GUIObjFind(id)
		If n>-1 Then
			GUIObjCleanup n
			x=O(n,3):y=O(n,4)
			w=O(n,5)-x:h=O(n,6)-y
			Select Case O(n,1)
				Case 1'button
					If O(n,2) And 8 Then'visible
						Box x,y,w,h,,O(n,7),O(n,7)
						GUIFrame n,0
						If O(n,2) And 4 Then'Enabled
							z=O(n,8)
						Else'ghosted
							z=Cgh
						EndIf
						Text w/2+x-FW()*Len(Ot(n))/2,h/2+y-FH()/2,Ot(n),,,,z,O(n,7)
					Else'erase
						GUIObjCleanup n,1
					EndIf
				Case 2'radio
					If O(n,2) And 8 Then'visible
						x=x+5:y=y+5
						If O(n,2) And 4 Then'Enabled
							If O(n,2) And 32 Then'set
								Circle x,y,4,,,O(n,8),O(n,8)
								Colour 0:For nn=2.34 To 5.5 Step 0.2:Pixel x+6*Sin(nn),y+6*Cos(nn):Next
								Colour &hffffff:For nn=5.5 To 8.64 Step 0.2:Pixel x+6*Sin(nn),y+6*Cos(nn):Next
							Else
								Circle x,y,4,,,CGy,CGy
								Colour &hffffff:For nn=2.34 To 5.5 Step 0.2:Pixel x+6*Sin(nn),y+6*Cos(nn):Next
								Colour 0:For nn=5.5 To 8.64 Step 0.2:Pixel x+6*Sin(nn),y+6*Cos(nn):Next
							EndIf
							Colour 0
						Else
							Circle x,y,4,,,CGy,CGy
							Colour Cgh:For nn=0 To 6.4 Step 0.2:Pixel x+6*Sin(nn),y+6*Cos(nn):Next
						EndIf
						Text x+15,y+(h/2)-FH(),Ot(n)
					Else'erase
						GUIObjCleanup n,1
					EndIf
				Case 3'checkbox
					If O(n,2) And 8 Then'visible		
						Colour 0:Line x,y,x,y+11:Line x,y,x+11,y:Colour &hffffff:Line x+11,y,x+11,y+11:Line x+11,y+11,x,y+11
						If O(n,2) And 4 Then'Enabled
							Colour 0
						Else'ghosted
							Colour Cgh
						EndIf
						If O(n,2) And 32 Then'checked
							GUI Bitmap x+2,y+2,&h18386C6CC6020301
						Else
							GUI Bitmap x+2,y+2,0
						EndIf						
						Text x+15,y+(h/2)-(FH()/2),Ot(n)						
					Else'erase
						GUIObjCleanup n,1
					EndIf
				Case 4'slider
					If O(n,2) And 8 Then'visible
						Box x-5,y,w+11,h+1,,CGY,CGy
						y=y+(h/2)
						Colour 0:Line x,y-2,x+w,y-2:Line x,y-2,x,y+2:Colour &hffffff:Line x,y+2,x+w,y+2:Line x+w,y+2,x+w,y-2:
						x=x+((w/(O(n,8)-O(n,7)))*O(n,10))
						y=O(n,4)
						'pointer
						If O(n,2) And 4 Then'Enabled
							Box x-5,y,11,h,,CGY,CGy
							Colour 0:Line x+5,y+3,x+5,y+h:Line x+5,y+h,x-5,y+h:Colour Cgh:Line x,y,x+5,y+3:Colour &hffffff:Line x-5,y+h,x-5,y+3:Line x-5,y+3,x,y
						Else
							Box x-5,y,11,h,,CGY,CGy
							Colour Cgh:Line x+5,y+3,x+5,y+h:Line x+5,y+h,x-5,y+h:Line x,y,x+5,y+3:Line x-5,y+h,x-5,y+3:Line x-5,y+3,x,y
						EndIf
					Else'erase
						GUIObjCleanup n,1
					EndIf
				Case 5'textbox
					If O(n,2) And 8 Then'visible
						Box x,y,w+1,h+1,,O(n,7),O(n,7)
						GUIFrame n,1
						Select Case O(n,9)>>4
							Case 0'L
								Text x,y,Ot(n),,,,O(n,8),O(n,7)
							Case 1'C
								Text w/2+x-FW()*Len(Ot(n))/2,h/2+y-FH()/2,Ot(n),,,,O(n,8),O(n,7)
							Case 2'R
								Text O(n,5)-(FW()*Len(Ot(n))),h/2+y-FH()/2,Ot(n),,,,O(n,8),O(n,7)
						End Select
					Else'erase
						GUIObjCleanup n,1
					EndIf
				Case 6'list static
				Case 7'list dropdown
				Case 8'progress bar
					If O(n,2) And 8 Then'visible
						GUIFrame n,1
						If O(n,9) And &h10 Then'vert
							z=(h/(O(n,8)-O(n,7)))*O(n,10)
							Box x,y,w,h-z,,cGy,cGy
							Box x,(y+h)-z,w,z,,O(n,9)>>8,O(n,9)>>8
						Else'hoz
							z=(w/(O(n,8)-O(n,7)))*O(n,10)
							Box x+z,y,w-z,h,,cGy,cGy
							Box x,y,z,h,,O(n,9)>>8,O(n,9)>>8
						EndIf
					Else'erase
						GUIObjCleanup n,1
					EndIf
				Case 9'frame
					GUIFrame n,0
					Colour 0,cGy
					Text x+5,y-FH()/2,Ot(n)
			End Select
		EndIf
	End Sub

'set values of gadget by its numeric name
	Sub GUIObjVSet(id As Integer,cv As Integer)
		Local Integer n
		n=GUIObjFind(id)
		If n>-1 Then
			Select Case O(n,1)
				Case 4,8
					O(n,10)=Constrain(cv,O(n,7),O(n,8))
			End Select
		EndIf
	End Sub

	Function GUIObjVGet(id As Integer)
		Local Integer n
		n=GUIObjFind(id)
		If n>-1 Then
			Select Case O(n,1)
				Case 2,3
					GUIObjVGet=O(n,2) And 32
				Case 4,8
					GUIObjVGet=O(n,10)
			End Select
		EndIf
	End Function

'draws any type of border around an object
	Sub GUIFrame(n As Integer,os As Integer)
		Local Integer c1,c2
		Select Case O(n,9) And &h0F
			Case 0'none
				c1=cGy:c2=cGy
			Case 1'button style raised
				c1=&hffffff:c2=0
			Case 2'button style depressed
				c1=0:c2=&hffffff
			Case 3'white
				c1=&hffffff:c2=&hffffff
			Case 4'black
				c1=0:c2=0
			Case 5'grey (disabled)
				c1=Cgh:c2=Cgh
		End Select
		Colour c1:Line O(n,3)-os,O(n,4)-os,O(n,3)-os,O(n,6)+os:Line O(n,3)-os,O(n,4)-os,O(n,5)+os,O(n,4)-os:Colour c2:Line O(n,5)+os,O(n,4)-os,O(n,5)+os,O(n,6)+os:Line O(n,3)-os,O(n,6)+os,O(n,5)+os,O(n,6)+os
	End Sub

'removes an object from the screen by its internal reference
	Sub GUIObjCleanup(n,f)
		If f Or (O(n,2) And 64) Then
			Box O(n,3)-1,O(n,4)-1,O(n,5)-O(n,3)+1,O(n,6)-O(n,4)+1,,cGy,cGy
		EndIf
		O(n,2)=O(n,2) And &hBF'clear cleanup flag
	End Sub

'Sets the properties of an object
'Returns -1 if not found
	Function GUIObjPSet(id As Integer,b As Integer) As Integer'id,enabled,visible,touched,Set,cleanup
		Local Integer n
		n=GUIObjFind(id)
		If n>-1 Then
			O(n,2)=b:Exit Function
		EndIf
		GUIObjPSet=-1'object not found
	End Function

'Returns the properties of an object by its numeric name
'Returns the properties or -1 if not found
	Function GUIObjPGet(id As Integer) As Integer
		Local Integer n
		n=GUIObjFind(id)
		If n>-1 Then
			GUIObjPGet=O(n,2):Exit Function
		EndIf
		GUIObjPGet=-1'object not found
	End Function

'Finds the internal reference for an object from its numeric name
'Returns the object number or -1 if not found
	Function GUIObjFind(id)
		Local Integer n
		For n=0 To P-1
			If O(n,0)=id Then GUIObjFind=n:Exit Function'object exists
		Next
		GUIObjFind=-1
	End Function

'force a value within boundaries
	Function Constrain(v As Integer,l As Integer,u As Integer) As Integer
        Constrain=Min(Max(v,l),u)
    End Function

'defines an object but doesn't draw anything. returns 0 if all OK.
'res=GUIObjDef(21,1,10,10,80,30,"Save",&hffggbb,,1)
	Function GUIObjDef(id As Integer,tp As Integer,x As Integer,y As Integer,w As Integer,h As Integer,t$,g As Integer,c As Integer,d As Integer) As Integer
		Local Integer n
		If P>Objs Then GUIObjDef=1:Exit Function'too many objects
		n=GUIObjFind(id)
		If n=-1 Then n=P:P=P+1'define or redefine. P always points to the next free "slot"
		O(n,0)=id
		O(n,1)=tp
		O(n,2)=0
		O(n,3)=x
		O(n,4)=y
		O(n,7)=g			
		O(n,8)=c
		O(n,9)=d
		O(n,10)=g
		Ot(n)=t$
		Select Case tp
			Case 1,5,8,9'button,textbox,progress bar,frame
				O(n,5)=x+w
				O(n,6)=y+h
				If O(n,7)+O(n,8)=0 Then O(n,7)=CGy
			Case 2,3'Radio,checkbox
				O(n,5)=x+15+FW()*Len(t$)
				O(n,6)=y+FH()
			Case 4'Slider
				O(n,4)=y-4
				O(n,5)=x+w
				O(n,6)=y+14
			Case 6'List Static
			Case 7'List DropDown
		End Select
	End Function

'compatibility functions
	Function FH() As Integer
		If CMM2 Then
			FH=MM.INFO(FONTHEIGHT)
		Else
			FH=MM.FONTHEIGHT
		EndIf
	End Function

	Function FW() As Integer
		If CMM2 Then
			FW=MM.INFO(FONTWIDTH)
		Else
			FW=MM.FONTWIDTH
		EndIf
	End Function

	Sub GetTouch
		If CMM2 Then
			GUI CURSOR MOUSE(x,0),MOUSE(y,0)'here or main loop
			Xt=-1
			If Mouse(R,mp) Then Save Image "GUI.bmp",0,0,320,240
			If Mouse(L,mp) Then
				Xt=mouse(X,mp):Yt=mouse(Y,mp)
			EndIf
		Else
			Xt=Touch(X):Yt=Touch(Y)
		EndIf
	End Sub